Strawberry Bostock

A #BetterMorning starts with this unsung hero of the French pastry world.

Sponsored by Balmuda

A better morning for us is a cup of coffee and a warm, homemade pastry—but one that doesn’t take hours to make or skilled technique. Bostock has the flavor of a fancy almond croissant with the soul of a French grand-mère. In our version of this underappreciated breakfast treat, a thick slice of toasted brioche is soaked in honey simple syrup, slathered with strawberry jam and topped with almond frangipane that takes mere minutes to make.

We are excited to offer this recipe in partnership with BALMUDA on their launch from Japan to the U.S. Bostock is our ideal use of BALMUDA The Toaster, with its ability to both toast and bake. The toasting function uses steam technology to produce brioche that is our definition of the perfect toast: golden brown and crisp on the outside with a moist interior. After the toppings are added, switch to oven mode to bake the bostock until gooey and caramelized.

Makes 2 pastries; serves 2 to 4

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • 1 cup sliced almonds (divided)
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more for sprinkling
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for greasing
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon pure almond extract (optional)
  • 2 slices brioche cut 1-inch thick
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 heaping tablespoons strawberry jam
  • 2 large strawberries, hulled and sliced
  • Powdered sugar for dusting

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. In a food processor, combine 3/4 cup of the almonds, the sugar and salt. Process until the almonds are pulverized to a fine meal. Add the butter, eggs and almond extract (if using). Process until smooth and completely incorporated. Transfer the almond frangipane to an airtight container and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 1 hour. (It can be made up to 3 days ahead.)
  2. Toast the bread until golden brown and crisp.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the honey with 1 tablespoon hot water, stirring to dissolve. Stir in the lemon juice.
  4. Grease the baking pan with butter and add the toasted brioche. Brush the syrup on top of each, dividing it evenly, and briefly let it soak in. Smear the jam all the way to the edges of each toast. Drop spoonfuls of the almond frangipane over the jam and gently spread it out a bit, but try not to push the jam off the edges too much. Sprinkle each with 2 tablespoons of the remaining almonds. Fan a sliced strawberry in the center of each, and sprinkle a little more salt over the toppings.
  5. Bake at 400˚F until the frangipane is puffy and deeply browned on the outside and a little gooey in the center, about 15 minutes. (Watch closely during the last few minutes to avoid burning the almonds.) Let cool for a few minutes, then dust the bostock with powdered sugar and serve warm.

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Steamed Mussels with Fennel and Preserved Lemon Cream

Mussels are a weeknight dinner flex.

Sponsored by All-Clad

Preserved lemons are an alluring ingredient in tagines and chermoula, but the fun doesn’t have to stop at North African cuisine. They pack a salty punch like anchovies (hold the fishiness) and offer a complex sour flavor that you don’t get from fresh lemons. Unlike with fresh lemons, the rinds are the prized part—at once tender and meaty, tart and bitter—but the flesh is edible, too, so use it all. Adding sliced preserved lemons does wonders for nearly any seafood dish, but particularly stews and sauces. Here, they give depth and brightness to a creamy broth for steaming mussels.

Fennel also plays a big role in the flavor dynamic, and all parts of the plant are used, including the stalks (also edible!), fronds and pollen. Fennel pollen is the magic fairy dust that makes this dish extra special—and another ingredient worth seeking out—but ground fennel seeds are a fine substitute.

Because they are so quick to cook, and relatively inexpensive, mussels make an ideal weeknight meal that feels somewhat fancy, but also not. Just don’t forget the bread. Good bread is crucial for sopping up every last drop of that fennel-flecked, preserved-lemony broth.

Serves 2 to 3 as a main, or 4 to 6 as a party snack

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • 1 fennel bulb with tops attached
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 shallots, thinly sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 4 thyme sprigs
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper (or black is fine)
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 cup crème fraîche or sour cream
  • 1/2 cup rinsed and sliced preserved lemons, seeds removed
  • 2 pounds mussels, scrubbed and debearded
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel pollen or ground toasted fennel seeds
  • Sea salt, if needed
  • Grilled or toasted rustic bread for serving

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Trim the base of the fennel bulb and cut off and reserve the stalks and fronds. Halve the bulb lengthwise and make a “V” cut in each half to remove the core. Thinly slice the bulb lengthwise following the natural ridges and the stalks crosswise into coins. Coarsely chop the fronds and set them aside for later.
  2. Heat the oil in a deep pan with a lid over medium heat until shimmering. Add the sliced fennel bulb and stalks, shallots, garlic, thyme sprigs and pepper, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are soft and beginning to brown, 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. Stir in the wine, crème fraîche and preserved lemons. Increase the heat to high to bring the mixture to a boil. Add the mussels and toss to coat, cover and steam until the mussels open, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove the lid and discard any mussels that failed to open. Stir in the fennel fronds and fennel pollen. Taste the broth and add salt if it needs it.
  4. Serve the mussels directly from the pot at the table, ladling a good amount of broth into each bowl, with plenty of bread for dipping.

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Potato Rösti with Sour Cream, Buttered Peas, Fried Onions and Herbs

Hashbrowns in the form of a giant potato pancake for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

The Swiss have cornered the market on melted cheese, but they are almost as equally adept with fried potatoes. Case in point: Rösti (“rooshtee”) is a giant, crispy potato pancake cooked in a skillet. Think of it as a mashup of the latkes you love at the Jewish diner and the shredded hashbrowns cooked on a flattop at your favorite greasy spoon.

Key to the perfect rösti is maintaining a steady, moderate heat under the skillet to allow the potatoes to cook evenly from the middle to the edges. Then it’s flipped out onto a plate and slid back into the skillet to brown on the other side before going in a hot oven to finish baking the center.

Perhaps the best part of this particular version is the topping of tender sweet peas tossed with browned onions and fresh dill and chives that’s spooned over a big dollop of sour cream on top of the rösti. It’s a party where lots of different textures and sweet, sour and salty flavors mingle freely.

Makes 6 servings

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • 2 1/2 pounds large russet potatoes
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt (divided)
  • 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for greasing (divided)
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter (divided)
  • 1/2 yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup peas, fresh or defrosted frozen
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chives snipped in 1-inch segments
  • 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped dill
  • 1/2 cup sour cream

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F with a rack in the center.
  2. Peel the potatoes and grate them using the grater attachment on a food processor or the largest holes of a box grater. If going at it by hand, hold the potatoes lengthwise against the grater and use long strokes to get as long of shreds as possible. Transfer the potato shreds to a colander and rinse them with cool water until the water runs clear; drain well. Sprinkle 2 teaspoons of the salt over the potatoes and toss to coat evenly. Let drain in the colander placed in the sink for about 10 minutes. Squeeze the potatoes by the handful to release as much additional liquid as possible and transfer them to a bowl.
  3. Heat a 10-inch skillet over medium heat. Add a small drizzle of oil and swirl to coat the bottom and edges of the skillet. Let the pan heat until the oil is smoking, then dump out the excess oil. (This will create a nonstick surface.) Immediately add 2 tablespoons of the oil and 2 tablespoons of the butter; the skillet should be so hot that it bubbles and begins melting immediately. Once the butter is melted, add the potatoes and return the skillet to medium heat. Gently flatten the potatoes to an even layer that reaches to the edges of the pan. Drizzle the remaining 3 tablespoons of oil around the edges of the pan. Cook until the bottom is crisp and nicely browned, occasionally rotating the pan over the heat for even cooking, 6 to 8 minutes.
  4. Place a large plate upside down over the skillet and flip to invert the rösti onto the plate. Slide it back into the skillet to cook until crisp and brown on the other side, 6 to 8 minutes. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake until the rösti is a deep golden brown on the top and bottom and cooked through, 15 to 20 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring often, until deeply browned and a little sticky, 8 to 10 minutes. Stir in the peas and season with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and the pepper. Cook until warmed through, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the chives and dill.
  6. When it’s done, remove the rösti from the oven and slide it from the skillet to a cooling rack for about 5 minutes to maximize the crispness.
  7. To serve, transfer the rostï to a large plate and spread the sour cream in a big circle on top. Spoon the pea mixture in a pile over the sour cream, then cut into wedges.

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Rosé-Poached Rhubarb with Tarragon and Vanilla

Rhubarb loves rosé as much as you do.

Bowls by West Elm

You know that half drunk bottle of rosé lurking in your fridge? Pour it into a pot and poach some rhubarb, and then do about a million things with it. Serve it alongside panna cotta or ice cream, fix a simple dessert of rosé-poached rhubarb with mascarpone, pistachios, and pink pepper (pictured here), and use the leftover syrup to make a refreshing Rhubarb-Elderflower Spritz, just to name a few.

Makes about 1 pint

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • 1 pound rhubarb
  • 2 cups rosé wine (nothing fancy, but decent)
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 vanilla bean, slit lengthwise and seeds scraped
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 4 sprigs fresh tarragon
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Trim the tops and ends from the rhubarb and cut each stalk on a bias into 3-inch segments.
  2. Combine the wine, sugar, vanilla bean pod and seeds, and salt. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Add the rhubarb and cook until it’s exceptionally tender but still holds its shape, adjusting the heat as needed to keep the poaching liquid just below a simmer, 8 to 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, carefully transfer the poached rhubarb to a plate and set aside.
  3. Bring the poaching liquid to a boil over high heat and reduce to a syrupy consistency, 10 to 15 minutes. It’s ready when big bubbles form on the surface and a thin coating sticks to the back of a spoon.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat and add the tarragon. Steep for 10 minutes, then remove the tarragon. Continuing cooling the syrup to room temperature.
  5. Strain the syrup through a fine mesh sieve. Stir in the lemon juice, and return the rhubarb to the syrup.
  6. Store It: The rhubarb will keep in the syrup in a covered container in the refrigerator for about 1 week.

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SloBurn approved knife by Material Kitchen

Skillet-Roasted Chicken Thighs and Lots of Vegetables

Herby, lemony and shockingly easy.

Perfect to make in a Le Creuset skillet

Colorful vegetables are as much a star of this one-pan show as the chicken. Both are tossed with plenty of fresh Provençal herbs and lemon juice and a long pour of olive oil that all comes together as a sauce in the bottom of the skillet. It’s easy, it’s delicious, and it’s something you will make again and again.

Makes 4 servings

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • 1 bunch small carrots
  • 1 bunch radishes
  • 1 fennel bulb
  • 1 large leek
  • 4 large chicken thighs (about 2 pounds total)
  • 1/2 cup chopped mixed fresh herbs, such as rosemary, thyme, sage, and lavender
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Zest and juice of 1 large lemon
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more for sprinkling
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Trim the tops from the carrots, leaving about 1 inch of stems attached, and peel them if their skins are fibrous, or leave them on if they’re thin and tender. Halve the carrots lengthwise. Trim the tops from the radishes, leaving about 1 inch of stems attached, and halve them lengthwise. Trim the tops from the fennel bulb, reserving some fronds for garnish. Cut the bulb lengthwise into 1/2-inch thick wedges so the core keeps them intact. Trim the root end from the leek and discard the dark green tops. Cut the white and pale green section in half lengthwise, and then into 3-inch segments.
  2. Place the vegetables and chicken in a very large bowl, and add the herbs, 3 tablespoons of the oil, the lemon zest and juice, salt, and pepper and toss to mingle. Set aside to marinate for 30 minutes to 1 hour, if you want, or cook immediately.
  3. Preheat the oven to 425˚F.
  4. Heat a heavy 12-inch skillet, preferably cast-iron, over medium-high heat until almost smoking. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the skillet. Season the chicken thighs with another big pinch of salt, and place them in the skillet, skin side down. Cook, undisturbed, until the skin is deeply browned and crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a plate, skin side up, and set aside. Add the carrots and fennel to the skillet with most of their cut sides down. Scatter the remaining vegetables in the skillet over the carrots and fennel, and drizzle in the juices and herbs from the bottom of the bowl. Nestle the chicken thighs skin side up over the vegetables and transfer the skillet to the oven.
  5. Cook until the chicken registers 170˚F on an instant-read thermometer and the vegetables are tender when pierced with a fork, 20 to 25 minutes. If the chicken thighs are done before the vegetables, transfer them to a plate and tent with foil while the vegetables continue roasting.
  6. Serve the chicken and vegetables straight from the skillet, garnished with fennel fronds, if using. Be sure to spoon up some of the sauce from the bottom of the pan for each portion.

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Green Goddess Dip

The best thing you can dip a raw vegetable in, period.

SloBurn Green Goddess Dip
Ceramic Plates and glassware available at March

Now is the time to fill your market basket with all those summer vegetables you can’t get your hands on the rest of the year. If crunchy lemon cucumbers, fairytale-esque patty pan squash, funky romanesco, pretty purple spring onions, and sweet snap peas and baby carrots fill your crisper, make a batch of this creamy, zesty, tarragon-forward take on Green Goddess dressing and dip away.

Makes 2 1/4 cups

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • 3/4 cup mayonnaise (we like Sir Kensington’s)
  • 3 tablespoons tarragon vinegar or white wine vinegar
  • 1 cup lightly packed parsley leaves
  • 1 cup lightly packed tarragon leaves
  • 4 green onions, white and light green parts coarsely chopped
  • 2 oil-packed anchovy fillets, drained
  • 1 garlic clove, smashed
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3/4 cup sour cream

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Combine the mayonnaise, vinegar, parsley, tarragon, onions, anchovies, garlic, salt, and pepper in a blender and blend until smooth. Add the sour cream and process just until blended. Transfer to a serving bowl or storage container.
  2. Store It: The dip will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

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Little Gem Wedges with Asparagus, Peas, and Hot Bacon Dressing

Combining two favorite old-school salads is a good thing.

Ceramic by Janaki Larsen

We love a classic-recipe mash up. Case in point: Hot bacon dressing is more commonly associated with wilted spinach, but it’s even better drizzled over a crisp wedge salad in lieu of creamy blue cheese. And instead of iceberg, try this with petite heads of lettuce called “Little Gems,” otherwise smallish heads of romaine will do just fine.

Makes 2 main course servings, or 4 sides

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • 2 large eggs
  • 12 ounces asparagus, ends snapped and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 cup sweet peas (defrosted if frozen)
  • 2 heads Little Gem lettuce or romaine hearts, cut into 4 wedges each
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 ounces thick-cut bacon, cut into 1/2-inch strips
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh chives
  • 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh dill

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Fill a medium saucepan two-thirds full of water and bring it to a boil over high heat. Prepare a large bowl of ice water and place it next to the stove.
  2. Reduce the heat to maintain a gentle simmer and slowly lower the eggs into the water. Cook for 6 minutes, then remove the eggs with a slotted spoon and plunge them into the ice water to stop cooking, about 2 minutes. To peel, gently tap the eggs with the back of a spoon, making tiny cracks all over the shells like a mosaic. Peel the eggs under cool water, beginning at the thickest end, and set aside.
  3. Return the pan of water to a simmer and season it generously with salt. Add the asparagus and cook until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes, then transfer to the bowl of ice water with a slotted spoon. Cool a few minutes then drain, dry well, and set aside.
  4. Add the peas to the simmering water and cook 1 to 2 minutes until bright green. Drain the peas through a strainer, and rinse them under cold water to stop cooking; set aside
  5. Arrange the lettuce wedges on a serving platter.
  6. Heat a 10-inch skillet over medium heat. Add the oil and bacon and cook until the bacon is browned and crisp on the edges but still chewy in the center, 4 to 6 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and transfer the bacon to a plate using a slotted spoon. Whisk the vinegar, honey, and mustard into the fat in the pan and season to taste with salt and pepper. Return the bacon to the pan and add the asparagus and peas. Toss to coat everything in the dressing.
  7. Pour the vinaigrette mixture over the lettuce wedges. Tear the eggs in half and nestle them around the salad. Top with the chives and dill and serve warm.

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Green Fettuccine in Sage Oil with Pecorino and Lemon

So you’ve made fresh pasta, treat it simply.

Plate by Era Ceramics

The most appropriate thing to do with a tangle of handmade noodles is to enjoy them in a decidedly unfussy way. You’ve taken the time to knead, and roll, and cut, and boil, after all. Sage-infused oil, sharp cheese, lemon zest, and a quick grating of nutmeg should do the trick.

Serves 4 to 6

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • Kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2/3 cup loosely packed fresh sage leaves
  • Finely grated zest and juice of 1 large lemon
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 pound Green Pasta
  • 1 cup finely grated pecorino romano cheese

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season it generously with salt.
  2. Warm the oil in a 10-inch skillet over medium-low heat. When a sage leaf gently sizzles when dropped in, add all the sage and fry until crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. (They will stop sizzling when completely crisp.) Remove the pan from the heat. Transfer the sage leaves to a plate lined with paper towels and season them with salt. Add the lemon zest (not juice) and nutmeg to the warm oil and set aside.
  3. Drop the pasta in the boiling water and cook, stirring often, until chewy and just cooked through (it won’t be al dente like dried pasta), about 2 minutes. When the pasta is done, reserve 1 cup of the cooking water, then drain it in a colander. Return the pasta to the pot and drizzle in the oil, lemon juice, and a splash of the cooking water and toss. Add half the pecorino and toss again. Add more cooking water until it’s a bit saucy and nicely coats the noodles. Taste and season with more salt, as needed.
  4. Serve the pasta with the remaining pecorino and sage leaves crushed on top.

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Green Pasta

Because homemade pasta is always worth the effort.

Fettucine noodles made with the SloBurn Approved Marcato Atlas pasta machine

If you have flour, eggs, and literally any type of deeply hued leafy greens on hand, you are ready to make green pasta. Adding greens to homemade pasta adds healthy stuff, sure, but we’re mostly here for the color pop. In early spring, nettles add an amazing flavor, if you can find them at your farmers market. But surely you’re going to be using baby spinach, or perhaps kale, or the bushy tops from a bunch of turnips. Arugula would add a nice peppery bite.

Serves 4 to 6

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • Kosher salt
  • 4 ounces tender greens, such as baby kale, arugula, or spinach leaves, or stinging nettles, any thick stems discarded
  • 4 large eggs plus 2 large egg yolks
  • 400 grams all-purpose flour (about 2 3/4 cups), plus more as needed

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season it generously with salt. Plunge the greens into the water and cook until wilted and tender, 2 to 4 minutes. Drain through a colander and rinse under cold running water to cool slightly. Use your hands to squeeze out as much water as possible. Place the blanched greens and the 4 whole eggs in a blender and buzz to a fine purée.
  2. Pour the flour in a pile on a work surface and make a wide well in the center. Pour the green purée in the center of the well and add the 2 egg yolks. Using a fork, whisk the yolks into the purée. Begin working the flour into the center, mixing it with the purée while maintaining the walls of the well at first, until the dough comes together in a shaggy mass and can hold shape. At this point, begin using your hands to knead the dough. Dust the work surface as needed to prevent sticking, but don’t work in more flour than the dough needs. Enough flour has been incorporated when it feels moist and a little tacky, but not sticky. Continue kneading the dough until it’s smooth and supple, 8 to 10 minutes. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set aside to rest at room temperature for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours.
  3. Cut the dough into four pieces, and work with one piece at a time, keeping the rest covered. Pat the piece of dough into a flat disk. Using a pasta-rolling machine, pass the dough through the widest setting, then fold it in half and pass it through again. Do this three to four times until the dough is smooth. Change to the next setting on the pasta roller and pass the dough through twice. The dough should now be a thick pasta sheet. Dust the sheet lightly with flour to prevent sticking. Continue passing the pasta sheet through each setting twice, stopping at the second thinnest setting (6 on a Marcato Atlas machine). Cut the long pasta sheet in half crosswise and lay it out flat, covered by a clean cloth. Repeat this process with the remaining dough.
  4. If your pasta machine has a cutting attachment, use it to cut each pasta sheet into fettuccine. If not, cut them by hand: working with one sheet at a time, dust both sides generously with flour and fold it loosely in half then in half again. Use a knife to cut 1/2-inch wide noodles.
  5. If they will be cooked immediately (or within a few hours), toss the noodles to break them up and sprinkle with more flour to thoroughly coat. Keep the noodles separated in piles. To dry, hang the noodles flat over a drying rack (a clothes line, coat hangers, or the back of a chair all work well for this) until completely dry and brittle.
  6. Store It: Dried pasta will keep in an airtight container for several weeks.

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Fava Beans and Summer Vegetables in Brodo

A brothy, restorative soup that you will crave, even on a warm summer night.

Bowl by Humble Ceramics

The tender fava bean is best treated simply. It mingles well with nearly all those other little early-summer vegetables you’ll find at the farmers market, so have fun with the possibilities. Sweet peas and hakurei turnips would be lovely here instead of carrots and zucchini. Asparagus and sliced radishes? Why not. This is for those days when you crave something wholesome and clean tasting, but deeply satisfying at the same time. Of course if you make your own chicken broth the dish becomes next-level.

Makes 4 servings

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[ingredients title=”Ingredients”]

  • 1 1/2 pounds fava beans in pod, shelled
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 ounces pancetta, chopped
  • 2 bulby spring onions, white and light green parts thinly sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 8 ounces small carrots, sliced
  • 5 cups chicken stock
  • 8 ounces small zucchini and/or summer squash, sliced
  • 2 handfuls fresh basil leaves, torn
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Grated pecorino romano cheese, to serve

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[directions title=”Directions”]

  1. Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring it to a boil. Prepare a bowl of ice water and set it near the stove. Snap the stem ends from the fava beans and peel away the stringy seams on either side of the pods. Pull open the pods and remove the beans inside. They have a light green, waxy outer shell that needs to be removed. To do this, drop the beans in the boiling water for about 1 minute, then drain and plunge them into the ice water for a few minutes. When cool enough to handle, tear the outer shell with your fingernail and pinch out the bright green beans inside. Discard the shells.
  2. Heat a soup pot over medium and add the olive oil. Cook the pancetta for a few minutes until it begins to crisp and turn golden brown, then add the onions and garlic and sweat over medium-low heat until meltingly soft, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the sliced carrots and cook a few minutes so they begin to soften, then pour in the broth and add the zucchini, one handful of the torn basil leaves, a couple big pinches of salt and several grinds of pepper. Simmer gently until the zucchini and carrots have a nice texture and the broth is flavorful, 10 to 15 minutes, adding the fava beans in the last few minutes of cooking.
  3. Stir in the second handful of torn basil and ladle the soup into bowls. Sprinkle with lots of pecorino and drizzle with a bit more olive oil.
  4. [/directions]

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